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Farragut

Just beyond Concord is Knox County’s only other incorporated community. Enhancing the nautical theme is some deep and authentic history. This northern bank of the river was the first home of the U.S. Navy’s first admiral, David Glasgow Farragut, the Union commander known for the famous order, “Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!” Named for the admiral, Farragut is an affluent suburban town previously known mainly as a historic spot called Campbell’s Station.

Farragut is mostly a bedroom community not known for tourism, but has a few landmarks to note. One is the old Campbell’s Station building, known as the Avery Russell House, a brick Federal-style house of unknown age (variously estimated from 1795 to 1835, though recent scholarship has suggested it’s ca. 1820) right on Kingston Pike. Campbell’s Station existed here as a lodging place by the 1790s. The remaining house, which may be the same building where President Andrew Jackson stayed in 1835–and where he encountered fellow tenant British geologist George Featherstonhaugh–is under redevelopment and may soon be reborn as an inn, returning to its original purpose. As is, it. makes an interesting contrast with the modern commercial development along the far-western end of Kingston Pike.

Near the Avery-Russell House was the site of the 1863 Battle fo Campbell Station. To its south is Farragut Town Hall, a modern building for public meetings, but whose front yard includes what’s surely the largest statue of Admiral Farragut south of Washington’s Farragut Square.


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